Tuesday, December 11, 2018

LINIERS

ARP 188 AND THE TADPOLE'S TAIL Image Credit: Hubble Legacy Archive, ESA, NASA; Processing: Faus Márquez (AAE)



Why does this galaxy have such a long tail? In this stunning vista, based on image data from the Hubble Legacy Archive, distant galaxies form a dramatic backdrop for disrupted spiral galaxy Arp 188, the Tadpole Galaxy. The cosmic tadpole is a mere 420 million light-years distant toward the northern constellation of the Dragon (Draco). Its eye-catching tail is about 280 thousand light-years long and features massive, bright blue star clusters. One story goes that a more compact intruder galaxy crossed in front of Arp 188 - from right to left in this view - and was slung around behind the Tadpole by their gravitational attraction. During the close encounter, tidal forces drew out the spiral galaxy's stars, gas, and dust forming the spectacular tail. The intruder galaxy itself, estimated to lie about 300 thousand light-years behind the Tadpole, can be seen through foreground spiral arms at the upper right. Following its terrestrial namesake, the Tadpole Galaxy will likely lose its tail as it grows older, the tail's star clusters forming smaller satellites of the large spiral galaxy.

46P/WIRTANEN Taken by Ruslan Merzlyakov on December 9, 2018 @ Skagen, Denmark



Comet 46P/Wirtanen over the sand-buried church, Skagen, Denmark.
Drove 60 km to have 15 minutes of clear sky before the clouds arrived..

Canon EOS 6D + Samyang 85mm + iOptron skytracker
30 seconds, f/2, ISO 1600

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COMET Taken by Yvan on December 9, 2018 @ Overmere, Belgium



Comet 46P/Wirtanen on December 9th, 2018.
150mm/f5 newton/Canon 700D
150x20s iso 1600

COMET WIRTANEN AND STAR CLUSTERS (IMPROVED) Taken by Petr Horálek on December 10, 2018 @ Ustupky, Czech Republic



As the comet Wirtanen gets closest to the Earth, it also gets to one of the most beautiful part of the sky – the constellation Taurus with star clusters Pleiades (upper left) and Hyades (lower left). Weather in the Czech Republic is, however, very bad, so I was truly lucky for about 17 minutes of clear skies. Not quite enough for some truly deep imaging, but still worthy for capturing all three object in one view. Comet Wirtanen is now about twice bigger in the sky than the full Moon and its angular diameter still grows. On 16th December, during its closest approach to Earth, the comet will project very close to the Pleiades… Used Canon 6D Baader IR midified, Sigma 50 mm, f3.2, ISO 6400, 33×30 s from Vixen Polarie mount (darkframes applied).

COMET WIRTANEN AND STAR CLUSTERS Taken by Petr Horálek on December 10, 2018 @ Ustupky, Czech Republic



As the comet Wirtanen gets closest to the Earth, it also gets to one of the most beautiful part of the sky – the constellation Taurus with star clusters Pleiades (upper left) and Hyades (lower left). Weather in the Czech Republic is, however, very bad, so I was truly lucky for about 17 minutes of clear skies. Not quite enough for some truly deep imaging, but still worthy for capturing all three object in one view. Comet Wirtanen is now about twice bigger in the sky than the full Moon and its angular diameter still grows. On 16th December, during its closest approach to Earth, the comet will project very close to the Pleiades… Used Canon 6D Baader IR midified, Sigma 50 mm, f3.2, ISO 6400, 33×30 s from Vixen Polarie mount (darkframes applied).