Tuesday, July 23, 2019

M82: GALAXY WITH A SUPERGALACTIC WIND Image Credit: NASA, ESA, Hubble; Processing & Copyright: Daniel Nobre



Why is the Cigar Galaxy billowing red smoke? M82, as this starburst galaxy is also known, was stirred up by a recent pass near large spiral galaxy M81. This doesn't fully explain the source of the red-glowing outwardly expanding gas and dust, however. Evidence indicates that this gas and dust is being driven out by the combined emerging particle winds of many stars, together creating a galactic superwind. The dust particles are thought to originate in M82's interstellar medium and are actually similar in size to particles in cigar smoke. The featured photographic mosaic highlights a specific color of red light strongly emitted by ionized hydrogen gas, showing detailed filaments of this gas and dust. The filaments extend for over 10,000 light years. The 12-million light-year distant Cigar Galaxy is the brightest galaxy in the sky in infrared light, and can be seen in visible light with a small telescope towards the constellation of the Great Bear (Ursa Major).

Monday, July 22, 2019

BLICK IN DIE STERNE: AD ZEIGT 16 GALAKTISCH-GENIALE PLANETARIEN

https://www.ad-magazin.de/article/planetarien?fbclid=IwAR3rZY0tcvF8X8ig0APbYjWg7U9Z73wVwiL1qlkao_OL2nCV1YWj4T6xk5c



































HDR: EARTH'S CIRCULAR SHADOW ON THE MOON Image Credit & Copyright: Cristian Fattinnanzi



What could create such a large circular shadow on the Moon? The Earth. Last week's full Moon -- the Buck Moon -- was so full that it fell almost exactly in a line with the Sun and the Earth. When that happens the Earth casts its shadow onto the Moon. The circularity of the Earth's shadow on the Moon was commented on by Aristotle and so has been noticed since at least the 4th century BC. What's new is humanity's ability to record this shadow with such high dynamic range (HDR). The featured HDR composite of last week's partial lunar eclipse combines 15 images and include an exposure as short as 1/400th of a second -- so as not to overexpose the brightest part -- and an exposure that lasted five seconds -- to bring up the dimmest part. This dimmest part -- inside Earth's umbra -- is not completely dark because some light is refracted through the Earth's atmosphere onto the Moon. A total lunar eclipse will occur next in 2021 May.

MANTENIMIENTO PLANETARIO CIUDAD DE ROSARIO - POR: GUSTAVO ARIAS //// FOTOS: ESMERALDA SOSA


.. colocando MOTOR ALTURA DE POLO ..












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