Saturday, May 27, 2017

COMET JOHNSON AND THE HERDSMAN Taken by Todd Bush on May 19, 2017 @ Banner Elk, NC USA



Comet Johnson-C/2015V2 near the double star Delta Bootis (in the constellation Bootes) Imaged with a Nikon 180mm lens at f3.2 ISO 2000 (Stack of 21 - 30 second exposures)

ISS Taken by Drew Buckley on May 25, 2017 @ Wales, UK


COMET JOHNSON V2 - SPECTACULAR ANTI TAIL Taken by Chris Schur on May 26, 2017 @ Payson, AZ



The comet is only a few days from orbital plane crossing,and the bright dust tail and thin dimmer gas tail are now nearly 180 degrees apart!

This was last night with a 10 f/3.8 Orion astrograph and a 2h exposure



COMET 41P/TUTTLE-GIACOBINI-KRESAK Taken by Yasushi Aoshima on May 19, 2017 @ Ishikawa, JAPAN





PARA VER FOTOS EN HD ABRIR SIGUIENTE LINK




RESEARCHERS SAW A PARTIAL SOLAR ECLIPSE IN SPACE WHEN IT CAUGHT THE MOON PASSING IN FRONT OF THE SUN. THE LUNAR TRANSIT LASTED ALMOST AN HOUR, BETWEEN 2:24 AND 3:17 P.M. EDT, WITH THE MOON COVERING ABOUT 89 PERCENT OF THE SUN AT THE PEAK OF ITS JOURNEY ACROSS THE SUN’S FACE.


It's ok to look. Yesterday @NASASunScience witnessed something peculiar happening around the sun.



Researchers saw a partial solar eclipse in space when it caught the moon passing in front of the sun. The lunar transit lasted almost an hour, between 2:24 and 3:17 p.m. EDT, with the moon covering about 89 percent of the sun at the peak of its journey across the sun’s face. The moon’s crisp horizon can be seen from this view because the moon has no atmosphere to distort the sunlight.

While the moon’s edge appears smooth in these images, it’s actually quite uneven. The surface of the moon is rugged, sprinkled with craters, valleys and mountains. Peer closely at the image, and you may notice the subtle, bumpy outline of these topographical features.

COMET CLARK IS NEAR THE EDGE Image Credit & Copyright: Raul Villaverde Fraile



Sweeping through this stunning field of view, Comet 71P/Clark really is in the foreground of these cosmic clouds. The 2 panel telescopic mosaic is color enhanced and is about 5 degrees (10 full moons) across. It captures the faint comet's position on the night of May 23/24 over 5 light-minutes from Earth, very near the line-of-sight to bright star Antares and the Rho Ophiuchi cloud complex. In the frame Antares, also known as Alpha Scorpii, is at bottom center surrounded by a dusty cosmic cloud reflecting the cool giant star's yellowish light. Globular star cluster M4 shines just right of Antares, but M4 lies some 7,000 light-years away compared to Antares' 500 light-year distance. Slightly closer than Antares, Rho Ophiuchi's bluish starlight is reflected by the dust in molecular clouds toward the top. You can spot the small coma and short tail of the comet as a faint smudge near the center of the left edge of the frame. Just look for the comet's striking greenish color, produced as diatomic carbon molecules fluoresce in sunlight.


JEAN-MICHEL JARRE ON EDWARD SNOWDEN, PETE TOWNSHEND, GUINNESS-RECORD CONCERTS


http://www.newsweek.com/jean-michel-jarre-edward-snowden-pete-townshend-guinness-book-world-records-614427






Friday, May 26, 2017

VISITA DE LA ESCUELA DE EMILIA GIMÉNEZ AL PLANETARIO ( SU PAPÁ WALTER TRABAJA EN EL MUSEO EXPERIMENTAL DE CIENCIAS )

THE FIRST STARMASTER, PORTRAITED IN THE ZEISS FACTORY DOME IN 1996.




WE ENJOY THE PROBABLY LAST HOT SUMMER DAYS HERE IN JENA. SUN IS RISING OVER THE HILLS "KERNBERGE". A CALM AND PEACEFUL MORNING...


THE FIRST STARMASTER, PORTRAITED IN THE ZEISS FACTORY DOME IN 1996.



THE 11TH FULLDOME FESTIVAL AWARDEES














9 TIPS PARA EVITAR QUE TE APUNES CON EL MAL DE ALTURA LA FALTA DE OXÍGENO PUEDE CAUSAR MÚLTIPLES SÍNTOMAS DEL “MAL DE ALTA MONTAÑA”. SÍNTOMAS Y CONSEJOS.


http://tn.com.ar/salud/fitness/9-tips-para-evitar-que-te-apunes-con-el-mal-de-altura_795369



ACTIVE REGIONS' MAGNETIC CONNECTION



video


Several bright bands of plasma connect from one active region to another, even though they are tens of thousands of miles away from each other (May 17-18, 2017). Active regions are, by their nature, strong magnetic areas with north and south poles. The plasma consists of charged particles that stream along the magnetic field lines between these two regions. These connecting lines are clearly visible in this wavelength of extreme ultraviolet light. Other loops and strands of bright plasma can be seen rising up and out of smaller active regions as well. The video covers about one days worth of activity.


Credit: Solar Dynamics Observatory, NASA.


A WHOLE NEW JUPITER: FIRST SCIENCE RESULTS FROM NASA’S JUNO MISSION




This image shows Jupiter’s south pole, as seen by NASA’s Juno spacecraft from an altitude of 32,000 miles
This image shows Jupiter’s south pole, as seen by NASA’s Juno spacecraft from an altitude of 32,000 miles (52,000 kilometers). The oval features are cyclones, up to 600 miles (1,000 kilometers) in diameter. Multiple images taken with the JunoCam instrument on three separate orbits were combined to show all areas in daylight, enhanced color, and stereographic projection.
Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Betsy Asher Hall/Gervasio Robles


Early science results from NASA’s Juno mission to Jupiter portray the largest planet in our solar system as a complex, gigantic, turbulent world, with Earth-sized polar cyclones, plunging storm systems that travel deep into the heart of the gas giant, and a mammoth, lumpy magnetic field that may indicate it was generated closer to the planet’s surface than previously thought.

“We are excited to share these early discoveries, which help us better understand what makes Jupiter so fascinating,” said Diane Brown, Juno program executive at NASA Headquarters in Washington. "It was a long trip to get to Jupiter, but these first results already demonstrate it was well worth the journey.”

Juno launched on Aug. 5, 2011, entering Jupiter’s orbit on July 4, 2016. The findings from the first data-collection pass, which flew within about 2,600 miles (4,200 kilometers) of Jupiter's swirling cloud tops on Aug. 27, are being published this week in two papers in the journal Science, as well as 44 papers in Geophysical Research Letters.

“We knew, going in, that Jupiter would throw us some curves,” said Scott Bolton, Juno principal investigator from the Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio. “But now that we are here we are finding that Jupiter can throw the heat, as well as knuckleballs and sliders. There is so much going on here that we didn’t expect that we have had to take a step back and begin to rethink of this as a whole new Jupiter.”

Among the findings that challenge assumptions are those provided by Juno’s imager, JunoCam. The images show both of Jupiter's poles are covered in Earth-sized swirling storms that are densely clustered and rubbing together.

“We're puzzled as to how they could be formed, how stable the configuration is, and why Jupiter’s north pole doesn't look like the south pole,” said Bolton. “We're questioning whether this is a dynamic system, and are we seeing just one stage, and over the next year, we're going to watch it disappear, or is this a stable configuration and these storms are circulating around one another?”

Another surprise comes from Juno’s Microwave Radiometer (MWR), which samples the thermal microwave radiation from Jupiter’s atmosphere, from the top of the ammonia clouds to deep within its atmosphere. The MWR data indicates that Jupiter’s iconic belts and zones are mysterious, with the belt near the equator penetrating all the way down, while the belts and zones at other latitudes seem to evolve to other structures. The data suggest the ammonia is quite variable and continues to increase as far down as we can see with MWR, which is a few hundred miles or kilometers.

Prior to the Juno mission, it was known that Jupiter had the most intense magnetic field in the solar system. Measurements of the massive planet’s magnetosphere, from Juno’s magnetometer investigation (MAG), indicate that Jupiter’s magnetic field is even stronger than models expected, and more irregular in shape. MAG data indicates the magnetic field greatly exceeded expectations at 7.766 Gauss, about 10 times stronger than the strongest magnetic field found on Earth.

“Juno is giving us a view of the magnetic field close to Jupiter that we’ve never had before,” said Jack Connerney, Juno deputy principal investigator and the lead for the mission’s magnetic field investigation at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. “Already we see that the magnetic field looks lumpy: it is stronger in some places and weaker in others. This uneven distribution suggests that the field might be generated by dynamo action closer to the surface, above the layer of metallic hydrogen. Every flyby we execute gets us closer to determining where and how Jupiter’s dynamo works.”

Juno also is designed to study the polar magnetosphere and the origin of Jupiter's powerful auroras—its northern and southern lights. These auroral emissions are caused by particles that pick up energy, slamming into atmospheric molecules. Juno’s initial observations indicate that the process seems to work differently at Jupiter than at Earth.

Juno is in a polar orbit around Jupiter, and the majority of each orbit is spent well away from the gas giant. But, once every 53 days, its trajectory approaches Jupiter from above its north pole, where it begins a two-hour transit (from pole to pole) flying north to south with its eight science instruments collecting data and its JunoCam public outreach camera snapping pictures. The download of six megabytes of data collected during the transit can take 1.5 days.

“Every 53 days, we go screaming by Jupiter, get doused by a fire hose of Jovian science, and there is always something new,” said Bolton. “On our next flyby on July 11, we will fly directly over one of the most iconic features in the entire solar system -- one that every school kid knows -- Jupiter’s Great Red Spot. If anybody is going to get to the bottom of what is going on below those mammoth swirling crimson cloud tops, it’s Juno and her cloud-piercing science instruments.”

NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, manages the Juno mission for NASA. The principal investigator is Scott Bolton of the Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio. The Juno mission is part of the New Frontiers Program managed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, for the agency’s Science Mission Directorate. Lockheed Martin Space Systems, in Denver, built the spacecraft.

More information on the Juno mission is available at:

https://www.nasa.gov/juno

http://missionjuno.org

Follow the mission on Facebook and Twitter at:

http://www.facebook.com/NASAJuno

http://www.twitter.com/NASAJuno



Dwayne Brown / Laurie Cantillo
Headquarters, Washington
202-358-1726 / 202-358-1077
dwayne.c.brown@nasa.gov / laura.l.cantillo@nasa.gov

DC Agle
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
818-393-9011
agle@jpl.nasa.gov

Nancy Neal Jones
Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.
301-286-0039
nancy.n.jones@nasa.gov

Deb Schmid
Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio
210-522-2254
dschmid@swri.org


SEQUENCE OF JUNO SPACECRAFT'S CLOSE APPROACH TO JUPITER



Juno telecon image
This sequence of enhanced-color images shows how quickly the viewing geometry changes for NASA’s Juno spacecraft as it swoops by Jupiter. The images were obtained by JunoCam.


Once every 53 days the Juno spacecraft swings close to Jupiter, speeding over its clouds. In just two hours, the spacecraft travels from a perch over Jupiter’s north pole through its closest approach (perijove), then passes over the south pole on its way back out. This sequence shows 14 enhanced-color images.

The first image on the left shows the entire half-lit globe of Jupiter, with the north pole approximately in the center. As the spacecraft gets closer to Jupiter, the horizon moves in and the range of visible latitudes shrinks. The third and fourth images in this sequence show the north polar region rotating away from our view while a band of wavy clouds at northern mid-latitudes comes into view. By the fifth image of the sequence the band of turbulent clouds is nicely centered in the image. The seventh and eighth images were taken just before the spacecraft was at its closest point to Jupiter, near Jupiter’s equator. Even though these two pictures were taken just four minutes apart, the view is changing quickly.

As the spacecraft crossed into the southern hemisphere, the bright “south tropical zone” dominates the ninth, 10th and 11th images. The white ovals in a feature nicknamed Jupiter’s “String of Pearls” are visible in the 12th and 13th images. In the 14th image Juno views Jupiter’s south poles.



Image Credit: NASA/SWRI/MSSS/Gerald Eichstädt/Seán Doran




`PARA VER IMAGEN EN HD ABRIR SIGUIENTE LINK



SPIRAL GALAXY NGC 6744 Image Credit & Copyright: Daniel Verschatse



Big, beautiful spiral galaxy NGC 6744 is nearly 175,000 light-years across, larger than our own Milky Way. It lies some 30 million light-years distant in the southern constellation Pavo appearing as a faint, extended object in small telescopes. We see the disk of the nearby island universe tilted towards our line of sight. This remarkably distinct and detailed galaxy portrait covers an area about the angular size of the full moon. In it, the giant galaxy's yellowish core is dominated by the light from old, cool stars. Beyond the core, spiral arms filled with young blue star clusters and pinkish star forming regions sweep past a smaller satellite galaxy at the lower left, reminiscent of the Milky Way's satellite galaxy the Large Magellanic Cloud.

ALMOST A YEAR AGO Taken by Peter Keszi on May 29, 2016 @ Nove Zamky, Slovakia


three more days and it will be one year after I capture this nice lightning
details: Canon EOS 600D
30s,f/10
ISO: 200
Focal Length 18.0mm

SATURN Taken by Max Mallon on May 26, 2017 @ Amsterdam






These are my latest, and once again best photos of Saturn ever. It was exceptionally clear and calm last night, so I went out, obviously.
Saturn is a pretty tough target, its far darker than Jupiter and Venus for example, and thus harder to get pictures of.
For this picture (the saturn alone one) Ive used a staggering 56744 frames, taken in about 25 minutes of footage.
For reference, for the Jupiter photos I often have like.. I dont know, 1500 frames or so, and 2 minutes of footage.
Saturn being at only 15 degrees above the horizon did not make matters easier. My ADC helped compensate dispersion.
Saturn doesnt change as much in half an hour time as Jupiter does, which makes it possible to gather data over a longer time frame, and treat it as a single moment, merging it all together.
The entire Cassini division is visible, except the part behind the planet for obvious reasons. Ive never got a picture that clear before.
Ive also included 2 shots of the moon-system of the planet.
The darker of the 2 consist of 4x8 seconds exposure merged, and the other one is a single 30 second exposure.
The faintest object captured is a nameless star of nearly 12th magnitude.

Setup:
6 inch Skywatcher Maksutov on EQ5 mount
2x Explore Scientific Barlow
ZWO ADC
ZWO ASI 120MC-S

3x 5 minutes at 20ms
2x 5 minutes at 40ms
35% best selected all combined.

Thursday, May 25, 2017

STAR TRAILS AROUND SOUTH CELESTIAL POLE Taken by Mauricio Arbex on May 23, 2017 @ Rio de Janeiro, Brasil



Picture took at the Planetarium of the City of Rio de Janeiro. At bottom the Dois Irmãos Hill.

Details: Camera Canon T3, 18mm lens, ISO 200, 109 frames with 30s exposure each.


NGC6946 AND A METEOR Taken by Yasushi Aoshima on May 19, 2017 @ Ishikawa, JAPAN



CASSINI LOOKS ON AS SOLSTICE ARRIVES AT SATURN


https://www.nasa.gov/feature/jpl/cassini-looks-on-as-solstice-arrives-at-saturn







STAR CLUSTER, SPIRAL GALAXY, SUPERNOVA Image Credit & Copyright: Paolo Demaria



A cosmic snapshot from May 19, this colorful telescopic field of view spans about 1 degree or 2 full moons on the sky. Spiky in appearance, foreground Milky Way stars are scattered toward the royal constellation Cepheus while stars of open cluster NGC 6939 gather about 5 thousand light-years in the distance near the top of the frame. Face-on spiral galaxy NGC 6946 is toward the lower left nearly 22 million light-years away. The helpful red lines identify recently discovered supernova SN 2017eaw, the death explosion of a massive star nestled in the galaxy's bluish spiral arms. In fact in the last 100 years, 10 supernovae have been discovered in NGC 6946. By comparison, the average rate of supernovae in our Milky Way is about 1 every 100 years or so. Of course, NGC 6946 is also known as The Fireworks Galaxy.



SUPERNOVA IN NGC 6946 Taken by Norbert Mrozek on May 21, 2017 @ Rönkhausen, Deutschland


ALFA CENTAURO & TRIANGULO AUSTRAL DESDE ROSARIO - ARGENTINA /// FOTOS: ESMERALDA SOSA 21-05-2017


.. 10:17pm ..








PARA VER FOTOS EN HD ABRIR SIGUIENTE LINK






CORONA AUSTRAL & SAGITARIO DESDE ROSARIO - ARGENTINA /// FOTOS: ESMERALDA SOSA












PARA VER FOTOS EN HD ABRIR SIGUIENTE LINK