Monday, August 21, 2017

SOLAR ECLIPSE Taken by Mohammad Rahimi on August 11, 2000 @ Iran






Total solar eclipse , 11 agug 1999 in esfahan , Iran



MILKY WAY OVER CHILEAN VOLCANOES Image Credit & Copyright: Carlos Eduardo Fairbairn




Sometimes, the sky mimics the ground. Taken in 2017 May from the Atacama Desert in Chile, the foreground of the featured image encompasses the dipping edge of the caldera of an extinct volcano. Poetically echoing the dip below is the arch of our Milky Way Galaxy above. Many famous icons dot this southern nighttime vista, including the center of our Milky Way Galaxy on the far left, the bright orange star Antares also on the left, the constellation of the Southern Cross near the top of the arch, and the red-glowing Gum Nebula on the far right. Just above the horizon and splitting two distant volcanic peaks near the image center is the Large Magellanic Cloud -- the largest satellite galaxy of the Milky Way.


Sunday, August 20, 2017

TUTE


TUTE


TUTE


ECLIPSE TOTAL DE SOL 03/11/1994 PUERTO IGUAZU MISIONES ARGENTINA /// FOTOS: ALEJANDRO Y CARLOS SOSA


 .. ya que esta vez les toca a los del NORTE ..


.. recordando el llamado ULTIMO ECLIPSE TOTAL DE SOL DEL SIGLO ( PASADO ) ..




COMET C2015ER61 Taken by CAZILHAC Robert on August 19, 2017 @ Lugny- North of France



comet C/2015 ER61 close to the Pleiades on 08/19/17
L80/FD7 30x20s gain 400 AS 160 0 mmcool
Meade LX200/ FD10 and 80x15s gain 400 -ASI 1600 mmcool -Bad transparency !


STELLARDRONE - BETWEEN THE RINGS ♥ ♪

SOLAR ACTIVITY COMING Taken by Johan Liv on August 20, 2017 @ Stockholm, Sweden



When I was imaging the Sun today with the beautiful group AR2671, I saw that even more activity is on its way around the limb, with new spots. The Sun really has woken up again.


TIME-LAPSE: A TOTAL SOLAR ECLIPSE Video Credit & Copyright: Colin Legg





Have you ever experienced a total eclipse of the Sun? This time-lapse movie depicts such an eclipse in dramatic detail, seen from Australia in 2012. As the video begins, a slight dimming of the Sun and the surrounding Earth is barely perceptible. As the Moon moves to cover nearly the entire Sun, darkness sweeps in from the left -- the fully blocked part of the Sun. At totality, only the bright solar corona extends past the edges of the Moon, and darkness surrounds you. Distant horizons are still bright, though, as they are not in the darkest part of the shadow. At mid-totality the darkness dips to the horizon below the eclipsed Sun, created by the shadow cone -- a corridor of shadow that traces back to the Moon. As the total solar eclipse ends -- usually after a few minutes -- the process reverses and Moon's shadow moves off to the other side. Tomorrow afternoon's total solar eclipse -- visible as at least a partial eclipse over all of North America -- can be experienced at social gatherings, some of which are being organized by local libraries.


NASA JETS CHASE THE TOTAL SOLAR ECLIPSE

TOTAL ECLIPSE 11 JUNE 1983 Taken by Peter Lowenstein on June 11, 2000 @ Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea






Here is an animation and three still pictures showing emergence from a total solar eclipse observed by me from Paga Hill, Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea on Saturday 11 June 1983. I was lucky to capture a black and white sequence of photographs of the Sun reappearing after totality at 15.42 LT (04.42 UT) which included a magnificent corona at maximum eclipse, Baily’s Beads a few minutes later and then a bright diamond ring. The pictures were taken using a tripod-mounted Olympus OM2-N 35 mm SLR camera attached to a Tamron 200-500 mm Zoom Lens set to 500mm with a Komura Telemore x2 extender providing a total focal length of 1000mm. Exposures around totality were several seconds at F11 using Kodak Tri-X 5062 ISO 400 panchromatic black and white negative film. The film was home developed and several sets of prints were painstakingly produced on Ilford 10 x 10” fine matt medium contrast bromide paper using a Durst M16 photographic enlarger. Although slightly yellowed with age after 34 years, still good enough to be scanned at 1200 dpi using an Epson Stylus C4300 to produce the attached images. Hope these give you some idea of the beauty to be expected from the forthcoming eclipse on 21 August 2017? Details of the 1983 eclipse available at https://www.timeanddate.com/eclipse/solar/1983-june-11


Saturday, August 19, 2017

P!NK - WHAT ABOUT US ♥ ♪








PLANETARIO CIUDAD DE ROSARIO - ARGENTINA /// FOTO: ESMERALDA SOSA



PERU: 3000-YEAR-OLD CIRCULAR STONE WALL FOUND IN CUSCO

http://www.andina.com.pe/Ingles/noticia-peru-3000yearold-circular-stone-wall-found-in-cusco-678217.aspx






AURORAS LIGHTS OF WONDER /// ZEISS FULL DOME SHOW

https://www.zeiss.de/planetariums/shows/astronomie-und-raumfahrtthemen/auroras-geheimnisvolle-lichter-des-nordens.html


INFOGRAPHIC: A HANDY GUIDE TO TOTAL SOLAR ECLIPSES






TOTAL SOLAR ECLIPSE OF 1979 Image Credit & Copyright: Jimmy Westlake (Colorado Mountain College)



From cold, clear skies over Riverton, Manitoba, Canada, planet Earth, the solar corona surrounds the silhouette of the New Moon in this telescopic snapshot of the total solar eclipse of February 26, 1979. Thirty eight years ago, it was the last total solar eclipse visible from the contiguous United States. The narrow path of totality ran through the northwestern states of Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana, and North Dakota before crossing into Canadian provinces Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario and Quebec. Following the upcoming August 21, 2017 total solar eclipse crossing the U.S. from coast to coast, an annular solar eclipse will be seen in the continental United States on October 14, 2023, visible along a route from Northern California to Florida. Then, the next total solar eclipse to touch the continental U.S. will track across 13 states from from Texas to Maine on April 8, 2024.


OLD MOON AND VENUS Taken by Dewey Vanderhoff on August 19, 2017 @ Cody , Wyoming USA



Two days before its lead role in the Great American Eclipse of 2017 , the Moon made a fine appearance in the pre-dawn skies of Wyoming alongside morning planet Venus. Wildfire smoke in western American skies add a ruddy color to the atmosphere.
Two mornings later the shadow of the New Moon will race diagonally across Wyoming. Centerline of totality is 125 miles south of my town of Cody.
Exposure for this photo was 2 seconds at f/2.8 at ISO 1600 using a 30 year old manual focus Nikkor 50mm f/1.4 lens on a Nikon D5300 dslr.