Saturday, December 16, 2017

CÓMO ES EL SUBMARINO DESAPARECIDO Y POR QUÉ DEBIÓ SER REPARADO

"DEL ARA SAN JUAN PUEDE NO HABER QUEDADO NADA", AFIRMA EL HOMBRE QUE ENCONTRÓ AL TITANIC ES TOM DETTWEILLER, EL MAYOR EXPERTO EN BÚSQUEDA Y RESCATE DE NAVES HUNDIDAS. QUIERE VENIR AL PAÍS PARA SABER QUÉ PASÓ.

https://www.clarin.com/sociedad/ara-san-juan-puede-quedado-afirma-hombre-encontro-titanic_0_HkIb4s-fG.html







ARA SAN JUAN: UN EX MARINO ESTADOUNIDENSE SE CONVIRTIÓ EN EL "PAPA NOEL" DE LOS HIJOS DE LOS TRIPULANTES EDWARD MICHAEL, UN EX SUBMARINISTA DE LA ARMADA NORTEAMERICANA, REALIZÓ UNA COLECTA QUE ALCANZÓ LOS 57.000 PESOS

http://www.lanacion.com.ar/2092078-ara-san-juan-un-ex-marino-estadounidense-se-convirtio-en-el-papa-noel-de-los-hijos-de-los-tripulantes



WHAT’S THE THINNEST CRESCENT MOON YOU CAN SEE? A SLENDER CRESCENT MOON IS A BEAUTIFUL AND INSPIRING SIGHT. DECEMBER AND JANUARY OFFER SEVERAL OPPORTUNITIES TO SEE THESE EXCEPTIONAL SLICES IN THE SKY. BY: BOB KING

http://www.skyandtelescope.com/astronomy-news/observing-news/thinnest-crescent-moon/









OFFICIAL NAMES APPROVED FOR 86 MORE STARS

http://www.skyandtelescope.com/astronomy-news/official-names-approved-for-86-more-stars/





PARA DESCARGAR LISTADO ABRIR SIGUIENTE LINK





UNA TAZA DE TÉ CALIENTE REDUCE EL RIESGO DE SUFRIR GLAUCOMA

https://www.rosario3.com/noticias/Una-taza-de-te-caliente-reduce-el-riesgo-de-sufrir-glaucoma-20171216-0007.html



SCIENTISTS MAP ANCIENT ROCK ART IN VENEZUELA


https://www.upi.com/Science_News/2017/12/07/Scientists-map-ancient-rock-art-in-Venezuela/2151512663060/





COMET C/2016 R2 PANSTARRS Taken by rolando ligustri on December 16, 2017 @ from New Mexico , ITelescope.net



in twenty years as a comet photographer, its the first time Ive seen a blue one. the puff that you see in NO I think it is a remnant of the outburst a few days ago. DK 500/2250 4x120 in bin2

GEMINIDS METEOR OVER GATEWAY OF A SHRINE Taken by KAGAYA on December 14, 2017 @ Ibaraki, Japan



Torii gate is the entrance to a sacred shrine.
I waited for the time in front of the Torii gate for 4 hour.
The shooting stars light was reflected on the sea.

A WINTRY SHOWER Image Credit & Copyright: Jack Fusco



Four Geminids flash through northern skies in this wintry night skyscape. The bright fireball and 3 fainter meteors were captured in a single 10 second exposure, near the peak of December's Geminid meteor shower. Reflecting the fireball's greenish light, a partially frozen Lake Edith in Alberta Canada's Jasper National Park lies in the foreground, with the Canadian Rocky Mountains ranging along the northern horizon. Of course, the glacial lake is cold even in summer. But photographer Jack Fusco reports that he experienced -9 degree C temperatures that night while enjoying one of the most active meteor showers he's ever seen.

ENTRE ALEMANES DEL VOLGA Y SUS DESCENDIENTES, RADICADOS EN LAS COLONIAS AGRÍCOLAS DEL NORTE DE SANTA FE, LA VÍA LÁCTEA ES CONOCIDA COMO "EL CASTIGO DE JACOB".



La denominaban así, ya que las “manchas oscuras” observadas en este rasgo importante del cielo, eran interpretadas como una discontinuidad de las zonas brillantes, y a la vez simbolizaba una “cadera quebrada” que recordaba “la pelea de Jacob" relatada en Génesis 32: 25-33, donde Jacob pelea toda la noche con un ángel quien finalmente le da un golpe en el muslo y se lo descoyuntura.

Visible como una amplia banda de brillo difuso salpicada por manchas obscuras que atraviesa la bóveda celeste, la Vía Láctea es lo que podemos ver desde la Tierra de las grandes aglomeraciones de estrellas, gas y polvo que conforman nuestra propia galaxia espiral.

Fuente: “A eucalyptus in the moon: folk astronomy among European colonists in northern Santa Fe province, Argentina”, en: "Archaeoastronomy and Ethnoastronomy: Building Bridges between Cultures", de A. Mudrik.

Friday, December 15, 2017

GEMINID SHOWER RADIANT Taken by Alan Dyer on December 13, 2017 @ near Portal, AZ



Heres a composite showing the 2017 Geminid meteors streaking from the radiant point in Gemini at upper left, above the blue-white star Castor. 2 or 3 meteors are not Geminids as their paths do not project back to the radiant, but I have left them in regardless, as an illustration.

This also illustrates how the meteor paths are shorter closer to the radiant and lengthen away from the radiant.

This is a stack of 43 exposures, each 1-minute with the 24mm Canon lens at f/2.5 and filter-modified Canon 5D MkII camera at ISO 6400, set fast to pick up the fainter meteors. These were the 43 exposures with meteors (some with 2 or 3 per frame) out of 455 taken over 5 hours. I shot this from southeast Arizona, near Portal.

GRAFFITI PERSIANA ( SAN LUIS ENTRE PARAGUAY Y PRESIDENTE ROCA ) ROSARIO - ARGENTINA




STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI SUNDTRACK MUSIC BY JOHN WILLIAMS









John Williams














FLY INTO THE GREAT RED SPOT OF JUPITER WITH NASA’S JUNO MISSION

GEMINIDS OF THE NORTH Image Credit & Copyright: Yin Hao



Earth's annual Geminid meteor shower did not disappoint as our fair planet plowed through dust from active asteroid 3200 Phaethon. Captured in this northern hemisphere nightscape, the meteors stream away from the shower's radiant in Gemini. To create the image, 37 individual frames recording meteor streaks were taken over period of 8.5 hours during the night of December 12/13. In the final composite they were selected and registered against the starry sky above a radio telescope dish of MUSER, a solar-dedicated radio telescope array at astronomically-named Mingantu Station in Inner Mongolia, China, about 400 kilometers from Beijing. Sirius, alpha star of Canis Major, shines brightly just above the radio dish and the Milky Way stretches toward the zenith. Yellowish Betelgeuse is a standout in Orion to the right of the northen Milky Way. The shower's radiant is at top left, high above the horizon near Castor and Pollux the twin stars of Gemini. The radiant effect is due to perspective as the parallel meteor tracks appear to converge in the distance. Gemini's meteors enter Earth's atmosphere traveling at about 22 kilometers per second.

SUBMARINO ARA SAN JUAN: LOS 10 PUNTOS CLAVE, EN UNA VISUALIZACIÓN

http://www.lanacion.com.ar/2091551-submarino-ara-san-juan-los-10-puntos-clave-en-una-visualizacion











ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE, NASA DATA USED TO DISCOVER EIGHTH PLANET CIRCLING DISTANT STAR


The Kepler-90 system is the first to tie with our solar system in number of planets.
With the discovery of an eighth planet, the Kepler-90 system is the first to tie with our solar system in number of planets.

Credits: NASA/Wendy Stenzel


Our solar system now is tied for most number of planets around a single star, with the recent discovery of an eighth planet circling Kepler-90, a Sun-like star 2,545 light-years from Earth. The planet was discovered in data from NASA’s Kepler Space Telescope.

The newly-discovered Kepler-90i – a sizzling hot, rocky planet that orbits its star once every 14.4 days – was found using machine learning from Google. Machine learning is an approach to artificial intelligence in which computers “learn.” In this case, computers learned to identify planets by finding in Kepler data instances where the telescope recorded signals from planets beyond our solar system, known as exoplanets.

NASA will host a Reddit Ask Me Anything at 3 p.m. EST today on this discovery.



Our solar system now is tied for most number of planets around a single star, with the recent discovery of an eighth planet circling Kepler-90, a Sun-like star 2,545 light years from Earth. The planet was discovered in data from NASA’s Kepler Space Telescope.

Credits: NASA


“Just as we expected, there are exciting discoveries lurking in our archived Kepler data, waiting for the right tool or technology to unearth them,” said Paul Hertz, director of NASA’s Astrophysics Division in Washington. “This finding shows that our data will be a treasure trove available to innovative researchers for years to come.”

The discovery came about after researchers Christopher Shallue and Andrew Vanderburg trained a computer to learn how to identify exoplanets in the light readings recorded by Kepler – the minuscule change in brightness captured when a planet passed in front of, or transited, a star. Inspired by the way neurons connect in the human brain, this artificial “neural network” sifted through Kepler data and found weak transit signals from a previously-missed eighth planet orbiting Kepler-90, in the constellation Draco.

While machine learning has previously been used in searches of the Kepler database, this research demonstrates that neural networks are a promising tool in finding some of the weakest signals of distant worlds.

Other planetary systems probably hold more promise for life than Kepler-90. About 30 percent larger than Earth, Kepler-90i is so close to its star that its average surface temperature is believed to exceed 800 degrees Fahrenheit, on par with Mercury. Its outermost planet, Kepler-90h, orbits at a similar distance to its star as Earth does to the Sun.

“The Kepler-90 star system is like a mini version of our solar system. You have small planets inside and big planets outside, but everything is scrunched in much closer,” said Vanderburg, a NASA Sagan Postdoctoral Fellow and astronomer at the University of Texas at Austin.

Shallue, a senior software engineer with Google’s research team Google AI, came up with the idea to apply a neural network to Kepler data. He became interested in exoplanet discovery after learning that astronomy, like other branches of science, is rapidly being inundated with data as the technology for data collection from space advances.

“In my spare time, I started googling for ‘finding exoplanets with large data sets’ and found out about the Kepler mission and the huge data set available,” said Shallue. "Machine learning really shines in situations where there is so much data that humans can't search it for themselves.”

Kepler’s four-year dataset consists of 35,000 possible planetary signals. Automated tests, and sometimes human eyes, are used to verify the most promising signals in the data. However, the weakest signals often are missed using these methods. Shallue and Vanderburg thought there could be more interesting exoplanet discoveries faintly lurking in the data.

First, they trained the neural network to identify transiting exoplanets using a set of 15,000 previously-vetted signals from the Kepler exoplanet catalogue. In the test set, the neural network correctly identified true planets and false positives 96 percent of the time. Then, with the neural network having "learned" to detect the pattern of a transiting exoplanet, the researchers directed their model to search for weaker signals in 670 star systems that already had multiple known planets. Their assumption was that multiple-planet systems would be the best places to look for more exoplanets.

“We got lots of false positives of planets, but also potentially more real planets,” said Vanderburg. “It’s like sifting through rocks to find jewels. If you have a finer sieve then you will catch more rocks but you might catch more jewels, as well.”

Kepler-90i wasn’t the only jewel this neural network sifted out. In the Kepler-80 system, they found a sixth planet. This one, the Earth-sized Kepler-80g, and four of its neighboring planets form what is called a resonant chain – where planets are locked by their mutual gravity in a rhythmic orbital dance. The result is an extremely stable system, similar to the seven planets in the TRAPPIST-1 system.

Their research paper reporting these findings has been accepted for publication in The Astronomical Journal. Shallue and Vanderburg plan to apply their neural network to Kepler’s full set of more than 150,000 stars.

Kepler has produced an unprecedented data set for exoplanet hunting. After gazing at one patch of space for four years, the spacecraft now is operating on an extended mission and switches its field of view every 80 days.

“These results demonstrate the enduring value of Kepler’s mission,” said Jessie Dotson, Kepler’s project scientist at NASA’s Ames Research Center in California’s Silicon Valley. “New ways of looking at the data – such as this early-stage research to apply machine learning algorithms – promises to continue to yield significant advances in our understanding of planetary systems around other stars. I’m sure there are more firsts in the data waiting for people to find them.”

Ames manages the Kepler and K2 missions for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, managed Kepler mission development. Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corporation operates the flight system with support from the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics at the University of Colorado in Boulder. This work was performed through the Carl Sagan Postdoctoral Fellowship Program executed by the NASA Exoplanet Science Institute.

For more information on this announcement, visit:

https://www.nasa.gov/mediaresources

For more information about the Kepler mission, visit:

https://www.nasa.gov/kepler



Felicia Chou
Headquarters, Washington
202-358-0257
felicia.chou@nasa.gov

Alison Hawkes
Ames Research Center, California’s Silicon Valley
650-604-0281
alison.j.hawkesbak@nasa.gov

Wednesday, December 13, 2017

GOLDEN HOUR /// FOTO: ESMERALDA SOSA /// ROSARIO - ARGENTINA


😊

PROMINENCE FALLS APART



A small prominence slowly rose further up above the sun, then fell apart and back into the sun over about seven hours (Dec. 6, 2017). Prominences, notoriously unstable, are cooler clouds of particles tethered not far above the sun by magnetic forces. When it stretched out, its distance above the sun was several times the size of Earth. Images were taken in a wavelength of extreme ultraviolet light. These images are colorized since we cannot "see" ultraviolet light. In this case, a yellow tone was used instead of the normal red tint we use for this 304 Angstrom wavelength.

Credit: Solar Dynamics Observatory, NASA.



METEORS OVER INNER MONGOLIA Image Credit & Copyright: Haitong Yu



Did you ever get caught in a meteor shower? If yes, then every minute or so the sky sparked with fleeting flashes of light. This was the fate of the pictured astrophotographer during last year's Perseids meteor shower. During the featured three-hour image composite, about 90 Perseids rained down above Lake Duolun of Inner Mongolia, China. If you trace back the meteor streaks, you will find that most of them appear to radiate from a single constellation -- in this case Perseus. In fact, you can even tell which meteors are not Perseids because they track differently. Tonight promises to be another good night to get caught in a meteor shower because it is the peak for the Geminids. Gemini, the shower radiant, should rise shortly after sunset and be visible most of the night.