Monday, January 28, 2019

A SPACE ROCK STRIKES MOON DURING THE TOTAL LUNAR ECLIPSE

https://www.skyandtelescope.com/observing/a-space-rock-strikes-moon-during-the-total-lunar-eclipse/








MY OWN GROWTH IN ASTROPHOTORAPHY Taken by Nunzio Micale on January 27, 2019 @ Vieste, South Italy




My own growth in astrophotoraphy

When I started taking astrophotographies I was just 12 y.o. so this is a little personal achievement.
The collage on subject is the result of six years of astrophotography. It shows the Solar System with the Sun, Mercury, Venus, the totality phase of 27th July 2018 total Lunar eclipse, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune and Pluto - this one is actually a dwarf planet.
Then there are also the C/2013 R1 Lovejoy and the 21P/Giacobini-Zinner comets on the typical summer sky as background and some renowed deep sky objects which are the Andromeda Galaxy (M31), the Orion Nebula (M42) and the North America Nebula (NGC 7000) in the center of the picture.

I used a Celestron 8 on Advanced VX NexStar+ mount, CCD QHY5L-II color, then a 70/500mm SkyWatcher, camera Canon EOS 1100D, Canon EOS 70D, Canon EF-S 18-55mm, Sigma 70-300mm F/4 5.6-AF DG, solar filter AstroSolar ND 3,8.

22 DEG HALO ON SNOW Taken by Juhani Kyyr枚 on January 27, 2019 @ Nummela, Finland



1/500s, f/8, ISO 64, -0.7Ev
Mode: A, Meter: Matrix, No Flash, Auto WB
Focal: 12mm, 27/01/2019 12.01.34, Adobe RGB (1998)
18.6MP (4 310x4 310) NIKON D810

Friday, January 25, 2019

LUNAR ECLIPSE MAGIC Taken by Ivar Hamberg on January 21, 2019 @ Old Town, Stockholm



We were lucky to have clear skies during the night and in the morning hours. However, it was freezing temperatures of minus 12C. The moon was beautifully hovering over the medieval Old Town of Stockholm. It was truly Magic! Just an hour after the eclipse, the clouds rolled in. I used both a fisheye lens, and a 300mm lens for the shots.

VANGELIS - NOCTURNE ♥ ♪











Thursday, January 24, 2019

A METEOROID HITS THE MOON DURING LUNAR ECLIPSE


On Jan. 21st at 04:41:43 UT, a meteoroid slammed into the Moon. We know this because so many people witnessed the explosion. It happened during a total eclipse of the Moon, visible from five continents. Dr. Fritz Helmut Hemmerich photographed the eclipse from the Canary Islands of Spain and captured the fireball:





"This is a happy shot!" says Hemmerich. "The shot just before and the shot just a few seconds later show nothing. The fireball was short-lived and I'm glad I caught it in this 2-second exposure."

Dozens of reliable images and videos of the impact have surfaced in the days since the eclipse. Analyzing one sharp image taken by Christian Fr枚schlin of the Netherlands, geologist Justin Cowart has estimated the selenographic coordinates of the impact site: 29.47S, 67.77W +/- 4km. This puts it just to the west of the lunar crater Lagrange H. NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter may be able to use such coordinates to target its cameras and photograph the crater.

Meteoroids hit the Moon all the time. Literally. NASA has been observing impact flashes since 2005. Recently, other groups in Europe have joined the hunt. Flashes are typically recorded once every 2 to 3 hours of observing time. Impactors range in size from softballs to boulders, liberating energies equal to tons of TNT when they strike.


Above: The impact flash, photographed by Hunter McWilliams of Lubbock, Texas





The rare thing about this strike is that it was photographed during a full Moon, when lunar glare usually overwhelms the glow of any fireball. During the eclipse, Earth's shadow turned lunar day into almost-night for an hour, allowing the fireball to be seen.

Readers, were you taking pictures of the eclipse around 04:41 UT? Check your photos. You might have captured an explosion. Submit images here.

Tuesday, January 22, 2019

FRASE




" VENUS & JUPITER " //// FOTO: ESMERALDA SOSA 21-01-2019






PARA VER FOTO EN HD ABRIR SIGUIENTE LINK










" THE RED / BLUE ECLIPSE " //// FOTO: ESMERALDA SOSA 21-01-2019 INFO ADICIONAL: LICENCIADO EN F脥SICA: JOS脡 LUIS LOM脕SCOLO


.. interesante variante ..





info:





El color rojo que presenta la Luna se debe a la luz refractada por la atm贸sfera terrestre que a sufrido la denominada dispersi贸n de Rayleigh.


La  dispersi贸n de Rayleigh es la dispersi贸n de la luz visible por part铆culas suspendidas en la atm贸sfera cuyo tama帽o es mucho menor que la longitud de onda de la luz dispersada, esta dispersi贸n es la que le otorga el color azul al cielo, si la luz atraviesa capas muy extensas de atm贸sfera la dispersi贸n de la componente azul de la misma hace que esta tome una coloraci贸n anaranjada o rojiza, esta es la que alcanza a la Luna y le da su color caracter铆stico.



La dispersi贸n de Rayleigh le da al cielo su
tonalidad azul.


Si la luz atraviesa capas extensas de atm贸sfera adquiere un color rojizo por p茅rdida de las componentes azules.



La dispersi贸n de Rayleigh en esta pieza de vidrio opalescente es la que le da su tonalidad azul, la
luz que lo atraviesa al perder sus componentes azules adquiere un color anaranjado.



El aspecto que present贸 el eclipse del 21 de enero del 2019 corresponde a un valor L4 en la escala de Danjon.


En 1921 el astr贸nomo franc茅s Andr茅 - Louis Danjon ( Caen, 6 de abril de 1890 - Surenes, 21 de abril de 1967 ), propuso una escala para describir la apariencia de la Luna durante un eclipse.



Escala de Danjon:

L0►Eclipse muy oscuro, Luna casi invisible.
L1►Eclipse oscuro, de color  gris o pardusco, es dif铆cil ver detalles de la superficie lunar.
L2►Eclipse  de  color rojo oscuro, la parte central de la sombra presenta un aspecto muy obscuro, mientras que el borde exterior de la misma es relativamente brillante.
L3►Eclipse de un color similar al del ladrillo rojo, la sombra suele tener un borde brillante o amarillo.
L4►Eclipse de color rojo cobre o anaranjado muy brillante, la sombra presenta un borde azulado.



info: 
Licenciado en F铆sica Jos茅 Luis Lom谩scolo




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THE BLUE LUNAR ECLIPSE


Lunar eclipses are supposed to be red, yet when the Moon passed through Earth's ruddy shadow on Jan. 20th, many observers witnessed a different color: turquoise blue. Heiko Ulbricht and Dirk Landrock photographed  the phenomenon from Radebeul, Germany:





"The colors were wonderful--red and blue," says Ulbricht.



The source of the turquoise is ozone. Prof. Richard Keen, an atmospheric scientist from the University of Colorado explains: "During a lunar eclipse, most of the light illuminating the Moon passes through the stratosphere, and is reddened by scattering. However, light passing through the upper stratosphere penetrates the ozone layer, which absorbs red light and actually makes the passing light ray bluer." This can be seen, he says, as a turquoise fringe around the red.

Blue appears during every total eclipse of the Moon. Naked-eye observers often miss it because it is fleeting, best seen only during the opening and closing minutes of totality. Binoculars and telescopes improves visibility. "We used a 14-inch Maksutov-Newton telescope," notes Ulbricht.

The blue eclipse was also seen in Argentina, Arizona, Oklahoma, Illinois, Italy, the Netherlands, and Kansas ... just to name a few.

HORIZONTE ESTE /// FOTO: ESMERALDA SOSA


UNSERE ZEITMASCHINE - DER STERNPROJEKTOR UNIVERSARIUM - BEKOMMT DIE ALLJ脛HRLICHE GENERAL脺BERHOLUNG. DAMIT DER STERNHIMMEL AUCH IN DIESEM JAHR WIEDER SCH脰N FUNKELT.


THE ZEISS PLANETARIUM FAMILY WITH LED UPGRADES CONTINUES TO GROW.


We offer the conversion to brighter LED lighting for our current projectors UNIVERSARIUM M IX, STARMASTER und SKYMASTER ZKP 4. The new illumination provides brighter stars, also sun, moon and planets shine more powerfully. Now the stars are pure white with an unequaled brilliance.
At the end of 2018, the projector of the Hayden Planetarium in New York, in operation since 2000, also received the new solid-state illumination along with other hardware and software upgrades. The customer described the effect of the "new" starry sky in just a single word: "Wow". New York also received extensive training on the new software and technical service from an elementary user perspective. Planetarium specialists from the USA with a wealth of experience introduced the Hayden Planetarium staff to the new possibilities.




THE NEXT PROJECTOR IS RECEIVING AN LED UPGRADE. LOOKING FORWARD TO EVEN BRIGHTER SHINING STARS IN THE STUTTGART PLANETARIUM!


ZEISS is servicing not only the latest models but older systems as well. Some even get a general overhaul to last several more decades.





TOTAL LUNAR ECLIPSE 2019 Taken by Nicolas SOLDATI on January 21, 2019 @ Gornergrat, Zermatt, Switzerland



On the foreground the Gornergrat Observatory is facing the Matterhorn, the most famous mountain in Switzerland.

Monday, January 21, 2019

ECLIPSE TOTAL DE LUNA /// FOTOS: ESMERALDA SOSA 21-01-2019


.. de 10.30pm a 5am ..


.. ECLIPSES BODRICOS SI LOS HAY .. pero este MUY ESPECIAL ..

.. repleto de NUBES, de todos los colores y tama帽os, hasta una suave brisa y un poquito de rocio ..

.. lo suficiente para que las fotos salgan GENIALES ! ..


.. COMO SIEMPRE EN ROSARIO EL ESPECT脕CULO FUE M脕S EL CLIMA QUE EL ECLIPSE ! ..


.. y de yapa a las 4am, J脷PITER CON VENUS ..








.. Gracias Raulito por la infograf铆a.. 




.. y tambi茅n a Cachitus! ( Licenciado en F铆sica Jos茅 Luis Lom谩scolo ) .. 













































.. nunca ARTURO esta de mas ..









.. y JUPITER & VENUS ..
















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